Writing Up A Storm!

As you can probably tell by the lack of post on this blog, it’s been a BUSY fall! I’ve taken on two sections of microbiology lab (only had to do one last semester and NONE over the summer) and that has kept me busy enough on its own.  On top of that, my research is continuously picking up steam and I’ve spent a lot more hours in the lab recently.

Beyond academic obligations, I’ve also been exploring a new hobby: SF writing.  Throughout my childhood and adolescence, I read the works of Asimov, Bradbury, and other “Golden Age” science fiction greats.  They inspired me to think scientifically and to consider alternate worlds and cultures.  I did also attempt some sci-fi writing (my favorite format has always been the short story).  Looking back on those early works, I see I was lacking a lot of the basic writing skills I’ve acquired through school and freelance blogging.

Recently I began working my way through The Collected Stories of Vernor Vinge (above: Analog, a magazine I’d LOVE to publish in some day; the cover of the aforementioned book).  Vinge’s science fiction isn’t the absolute greatest out there, but he DOES have the distinction of having coined the word “Singularity” as it pertains to the field of Futurism.  As I read into his vastly complex stories, I began to get the old itch again, the itch to create something of my own!

I set down at my computer and figured out a really neat idea based on some thoughts on physics.  After some analysis, though, I determined that my theory wasn’t quite as interesting, original, or even feasible as I thought.  I needed to find something else to base my story around.

A few days later, I had an interesting conversation with a labmate about The Singularity and some “endgame” scenarios proposed by Ray Kurtzweil.  I won’t go into detail, partially to protect the plot of my story, but essentially the entire universe becomes this enormous computer.  I took that idea and ran with it, putting together a dialog-driven short story.  The first draft FLEW out of my head and into the Word file and in two sittings I was done.

For the last month or so I’ve been proofing, drafting, and handing the story out to a choice number of people.  My ultimate goal is to publish in a reputable (read: paying) magazine or SF website.

I’ve been reading essays all over the web about how to write in the science fiction genre.  One of the best resources is the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America website.  If you sit down and read all of their “new writer” articles you’re well on your way already.  Of course being able to write is important too…

Another important tool I have discovered is the Critters SF and Fantasy Workshop.  Part of the larger Critique.org, Critters is a wonderful place to submit your manuscripts and critique manuscripts of others.  In order to keep away story thieves and, more importantly, bad critiquers, Critters has an activity ratio system (similar to how a private torrent tracker works) so that you must pitch in and write great critiques before you can get your own work reviewed.  Here’s their banner, since banners are fun and I want the community to stay nice and large:

Unleash your inner Shakespeare at Critters.org

If you’re interested in reading/proofing my story, feel free to @me on Twitter.  Otherwise, I’ll keep you guys posted on the story’s progression and if I ever get it sold!  I’ve sold TONS of articles to blogs and a few to print publications, but fiction is a new area for me and it’s a little intimidating to be honest.  Wish me luck!

[Cover Art Image from DarkRoastedBlend]

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